Gin Drinks

 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

is light and cool with a delightful after bite of peppermint. Looking for a interesting drink that combines Gin and oranges with a hint of peppermint? This is just the drink for you.

Aviation was drink popular in the 1920's. The name stems from the dash of Crème de Violette which gave the drink it's pale blue color.  A very classic gin drink it is very simple and period appropriate.  It is a drink that you pull out to impress your fiends with your knowledge of classic mixology.

Bee's Knees was slang in the 20's for something new and fresh, this drink was mostly likely named for that saying. We used Raw Organic Orange Blossom Honey to make the honey syrup. There are different raw honeys and they will carry with them the flower flavor so experiment if you're a honey lover.

This drink is strong enough to keep you going far into the night. This is a great drink for a late afternoon pool party. In a tall glass with lots of sparkle from the San Pellegrino this will be the hit of any summer party.

There have been whole blogs books and articles written on the Martini and if it should be shaken or stirred. Stirring is recommended for all drinks that do not contain fruit juice as it keeps the ice pieces created when shaking from diluting the drink. Martini people take their gin very seriously. So let’s break it down, Martinis = Gin and Vermouth. Modern Martinis use dry or white Vermouth. Now a days a dry Martini is one that has very little Vermouth, the dryer the smaller the portion of Vermouth to Gin, those with more Vermouth are wet. A dirty Martini is one where the brine from the olive jar is poured into the drink adding a salty taste. When you move into Vodka Martinis these are not true Martinis but are part of the drinks that are called Martinis or fill in the blank – tinis. Since we are more interested in what tasted good, a personal choice, we have a variety of Martinis including some that are tini’s called that more because of the glass they are served in as opposed to being a classic Martini. So have yours shaken or stirred, it’s up to you! Just enjoy. Like all spirit only drinks this is where you want to spend you dollars on the good stuff. Have a Gin tasting party with everyone bringing different brands and you’ll find that the tastes vary wildly. Have fun and bottoms up.

There have been whole blogs books and articles written on the Martini and if it should be shaken or stirred. Stirring is recommended for all drinks that do not contain fruit juice as it keeps the ice pieces created when shaking from diluting the drink. Martini people take their gin very seriously. So let’s break it down, Martinis = Gin and Vermouth. Modern Martinis use dry or white Vermouth. Now a days a dry Martini is one that has very little Vermouth, the dryer the smaller the portion of Vermouth to Gin, those with more Vermouth are wet. A dirty Martini is one where the brine from the olive jar is poured into the drink adding a salty taste. When you move into Vodka Martinis these are not true Martinis but are part of the drinks that are called Martinis or fill in the blank – tinis. Since we are more interested in what tasted good, a personal choice, we have a variety of Martinis including some that are tini’s called that more because of the glass they are served in as opposed to being a classic Martini. So have yours shaken or stirred, it’s up to you! Just enjoy. Like all spirit only drinks this is where you want to spend you dollars on the good stuff. Have a Gin tasting party with everyone bringing different brands and you’ll find that the tastes vary wildly. Have fun and bottoms up.

A riff on the classic cocktail the French 75, the Citrus 75 updates the taste and mood with the hint of citrus and a float of Gin. Very refreshing and light.

The French 75 was created in 1915 at the New York Bar in Paris---later Harry's New York Bar---by barman Harry MacElhone. The combination was said to have such a kick that it felt like being shelled with the powerful French 75mm field gun, also called a "75 Cocktail", or "Soixante Quinze" in French. The French 75 was popularized in America at the Stork Club in New York. An elegant drink with Gin and Champagne with a great kick it a drink that was enjoyed by the upper class elite both men and women. Shades of Downton Abbey all that is needed is lace gloves or an ascot.

One theory on the origin of the Gibson has Charles Dana Gibson responsible for the creation of the Gibson, when he supposedly asked Charley Connolly, the bartender of the Players Club in New York City, to improve upon the martini's recipe, so Connolly simply substituted an onion for the olive and named the drink after the patron. Another story given by Charles McCabe of the San Francisco Chronicle states it is from San Francisco. A.P. Gibson remembered that when he was a boy, his great-uncle, prominent San Francisco businessman Walter D. K. Gibson (1864–1938), was said to have created it at the Bohemian Club in the 1890s. Whatever the origin the drink remains a classic twist on the martini. Simple and clean usually served with a single onion it remains a standard.

Named after the rock band that never dies, the Grateful Dead will bring you quickly to that altered state of being that most Dead Heads aspire to. So fire up the “The Music Never Stopped” and bottoms up!

Long Island Iced Tea has disputed origins. Tea. However, numerous sources attribute the origin to one or both of two inventors in the 1970s or 1920s. The most believable is that Robert "Rosebud" Butt claims to have invented the drink as an entry in a contest to create a new mixed drink including Triple Sec, in 1972 while he worked at the Oak Beach Inn on Long Island, NY. Local rumors also ascribe the origin to either Butt or another bartender at the Old Beach Inn, Chris Bendicksen. It remains a kick sand in your face and get drunk kinda drink with 4 spirits and a cordial that make this drink about 22 proof when all is said and done. Back in the 20’s when many spirits were passed off as “tea” to avoid the stigma of drinking there were some similar drinks and even if they were a precursor to this drink it is more of a nod then a true twist on those drinks.

An aperitif the Negroni is a classic drink from 1919. Slightly bitter, many people double the amount of gin since the flavors of the Campri and sweet vermouth are no longer needed to mask the flavor of gin that would have been available during that time.

Nudist Colony is a drink with a lot of botanical overtones with the Chartreuse and Dubonnet. A great after dinner drink it has a lot of body and taste and is great for sipping. Very layered with each of the liquors bringing out their own character one at a time.

The Orange Buck is a great drink, tart and refreshing. We made this one with fresh squeezed organic juice to it was very tart. If you want more sweetness you can add 1/2 oz of simple syrup for a slightly sweeter taste.

Orange Cardamon Gin And Tonic is a great winter drink for Gin lovers.  The Root liqueur gives it a botanical spicy flavor like root beer and the Dry Fly Gin has just the right balance, not too much juniper, to blend it all together.  Adding notes of orange citrus makes it the perfect winter drink.  Experiment with the Gins if you prefer a London Dry style but we really liked the smoothness of this drink.  It could convert a few non-Gin drinkers!

Basically a gin martini with Crème de Cassis, currant flavor, the Parisian's flavor is a little sweeter and fruitier. Great if you need something to take the edge off the gin taste.

The creamier version of the Pink Lady for this recipe is thought to have been around since the 1920's. As most older drinks there are many versions this one uses both cream and an egg white. Once named on Esquire's list of the ten worst cocktails, most likely due to it's girly nature and color, it is still a great drink that has more kick then one would think.

Purple Haze Extreme and Purple Rain are named after 60’s and 80’s songs respectively. Great fun for a themed party or late night party both of these long drinks pack a punch. Keep the drivers out of the way of these bad boys!

A very old drink the Ramos Fizz has been around since 1888, however, it became widely available in the mid 1930's. A more labor entensive drink with multiple ingredients, it is fun to make and drink. One of the best parts is watching the foam appear on the top of the drink as you add the sparkling water!

A great take on "Gin and Juice", the addition of Cointreau and Grenadine offset the tart of the fresh lemon and orange juice in the Red Lion. Great to look at and even better going down, it's one of our new favorites.

This is a very interesting drink, substituting in sake for the vermouth and then adding orange and cherry flavored liquors then top with Ginger Beer.  An unusual east meets west drink.  While it may sound strange the taste is very refreshing and somewhat addictive.  We made several just to get the proportions right and with each one we liked it more.  Or the Gin was talking... either way, for the adventurous mixologist! 

The Salty Dog is the vodka version of the Greyhound. Most of these drinks are a riff on the drinks of the 1930’s when fruit juices were used to mask the taste of sub-par alcohol due to prohibition. A great summer drink with a salted rim and tang of grapefruit juice it is a drink for those of you who prefer salty over sweet.

An interesting drink that is very different but surprisingly good. Snowball has a licorice taste with a cream base. If you like licorice you'll like this drink.

This drink is all about sweet with an underlying tartness, much like a Southern Bride! This is a drink that is deceptively light, with 3oz of gin you need to be a little careful on how much you knock back.

Cider and Gin, what's not to like. Try the Stiff Upper Lip and enjoy the taste of Fall. We used a smoother Gin like Blue Coat American Gin versus one with heavy juniper notes. Your preference but either way this one was a winner.

Originally called the suffering Bar Steward, Suffering Bastard was supposed to cure a hangover. Not sure that it would but you don't need to wait to try it, this was one of our favorites of this batch.

There have been whole blogs books and articles written on the Martini and if it should be shaken or stirred. Stirring is recommended for all drinks that do not contain fruit juice as it keeps the ice pieces created when shaking from diluting the drink. Martini people take their gin very seriously. So let’s break it down, Martinis = Gin and Vermouth. Modern Martinis use dry or white Vermouth. Now a days a dry Martini is one that has very little Vermouth, the dryer the smaller the portion of Vermouth to Gin, those with more Vermouth are wet. A dirty Martini is one where the brine from the olive jar is poured into the drink adding a salty taste. When you move into Vodka Martinis these are not true Martinis but are part of the drinks that are called Martinis or fill in the blank – tinis. Since we are more interested in what tasted good, a personal choice, we have a variety of Martinis including some that are tini’s called that more because of the glass they are served in as opposed to being a classic Martini. So have yours shaken or stirred, it’s up to you! Just enjoy. Like all spirit only drinks this is where you want to spend you dollars on the good stuff. Have a Gin tasting party with everyone bringing different brands and you’ll find that the tastes vary wildly. Have fun and bottoms up.

Tom Collins – Born in the late 1800s as part of a joke that was based on a man “Tom Collins” who was talking about the listener. This Tom Collins was usually just around the corner at a bar where the listener would rush off to see to this person talking about him. The drink gained great popularity and even had songs created around it. It was made with Gin and sparkling lemonade and remains much unchanged even in current days. Other Collins drinks like Whiskey or Vodka Collins follow much the same format with just a different spirit.

The Union Jack is so fun with gin, sloe gin and grenadine. Pretty, bright and sween with very little mixer it is one to sip.

We don't know if Jerry Garcia drank these at Woodstock but I'm sure anyone would like this drink. Smooth and balanced with a nice little kick, this drink can turn into your favorite song.

The Breakfast Martini is great for brunch, so fun or when you need that Sunday morning hair of the dog. The classic Derby cocktail doesn't have to wait till one Sunday a year. It's great all summer long. Such a fun name, Playing Catch! The bitters keep it from being too sweet. Use a gin that is a little more fruity and not so much on the juniper side and the cocktail will come out great. Based on a James Bond book, the Casino Royal is a classic sounding and tasting cocktail with all the ingredients of a first rate cocktail. Just a kiss of Maraschino liqueur, the Cherry Kiss is a light fun drink that will give you just a hint of fall with the dusting of nutmeg. The Dessert Healer will cure what ails ya, great for a late afternoon or early evening cocktail this drink is a nice refreshing twist on a gin and juice.

Drinks on this list are: Animal Attack, Aviation, Bee's Knees, Bijou, Blood Orange Mist, Bombay Martini, Bombay Sapphire Martini, Breakfast Martini, Casino Royale, Cherry Kiss, Citrus 75, Corpse Reviver #2, Derby Cocktail, Dessert Healer, English Summer, Falls Last Call, French 75, Gibson, Gimlet, Grateful Dead, Greased Lighting, Grin And Bear It, Long Island Iced Tea, Maiden’s Prayer, Mountain Breeze, Negroni, Nuclear Ice Tea, Nudist Colony, Oh Be Joyful, Orange Buck, Orange Cardamon Gin And Tonic, Parisian, Pink Lady, Playing Catch, Purple Haze Extreme, Ramos Fizz, Red Lion, Sake-tini, Salty Dog, Seven Wins, Silver Streak, Snowball , Southern Bride, Stiff Upper Lip, Suffering Bastard, Tangerine Rosemary Spritzer, Tanqueray Martini, The Darb, Tom Collins, Union Jack, Watermelon Mint Spritzer, Woodstock,